Archive for December, 2011

Non-free Services

As both of my faithful readers can see, my blog postings have dropped significantly. I’ve been posting my random little comments on Google+ instead.

Which leads me to the following. There is a hard-core group of people who only use free software. I’m not quite that hard-core, but in practice I do use only free software, except perhaps for some binary drivers in the kernel (I don’t actually know whether the systems I’m running use binary drivers or not, and I’m not hard-core enough to find out).

I’ve seen some people argue that if you are serious about using free software, you should also only use Internet services which are themselves free software. For example, you should not use Facebook or Google+, because the software used to run those services is not free.

I don’t agree with that argument. The key goal of free software is that I always have the right to change the software that I am running. When I use an Internet service like Google+, I am not running the software. Even if I had a copy of the software, I would not be able to run it, because I don’t have enough servers. And even if I had enough servers, it would be useless for me to run the software, because I don’t have the data. And there is no way to grant me access to the data, because that would violate the reasonable privacy choices of everybody else using the service.

When it comes to a service like Google+, whether the software is free is not important. Releasing the software would not give me any more freedom than I already have. Google+ is only interesting when many people are operating out of a single shared data base, and that data base must have privacy safeguards to ensure that it is not copied.

What matters with Google+ is not the software, but the data. It is important that I be able to retrieve all my data associated with Google+, and that I be able to retrieve it in a way that makes it possible to use with other software. That is, I should be able to retrieve my posts, my comments on other people’s posts, my list of followers, my photos, etc. And I should be able to plug them into some other software service if I so choose.

In fact Google+ does have a set of APIs which permit me to retrieve my data. I haven’t verified that all Google+ data is available via the APIs, but all the obvious stuff seems to be available. Given those APIs, it should be possible for me to move all my data to some other service which provides te required APIs itself.

So I personally don’t see any reason why even a hard-core free software supporter should avoid using a service like Google+. This isn’t to say that it wouldn’t be nice if Google freed up the software and accepted patches from outside users. It’s just that that is not a critical part of freedom to use software.

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